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Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Most Common Diseases of 50plus: Thyroid disease: Hypothyroidism – The Diet

Kyle J. Norton(Scholar and Master of Nutrients, all right reserved)
Health article writer and researcher; Over 10.000 articles and research papers have been written and published on line, including world wide health, ezine articles, article base, healthblogs, selfgrowth, best before it's news, the karate GB daily, etc.,.
Named TOP 50 MEDICAL ESSAYS FOR ARTISTS & AUTHORS TO READ by Disilgold.com Named 50 of the best health Tweeters Canada - Huffington Post
Nominated for shorty award over last 4 years
Some articles have been used as references in medical research, such as international journal Pharma and Bio science, ISSN 0975-6299.


                         Thyroid disease


Thyroid disease is defined as a condition of malfunction of thyroid. Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland is over active and produces too much thyroid hormones.



                       Hypothyroidism


Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland is under active and produces very little thyroid hormones.

                        The Prevention

Diet to prevent Hypothyroidism
1. Seaweed, kelp or laver, seafood and seawater fish
According to the study by the University of Hong Kong, in the study carried out to analyse the urine iodine excretion in Hong Kong, a coastal city in the southern part of China because of a high incidence of transient neonatal hypothyroidism and a relatively high mean cord blood thyrotropin (TSH) concentration, found that 5.3% of the children, 51.7% of the adults and 55.3% of the elderly had urine iodine concentration below the criteria for iodine sufficiency (< 0.79 mumol/l). Iodine content in the drinking water and salt was low. A dietary survey revealed that seafood was not commonly consumed. 50-80% of the subjects never consumed high-iodine containing food such as seaweed, kelp or laver, and only 50% consumed seawater fish daily(47).

2. Iodized salt
In the study of Eearly morning urine collected from healthy volunteers including children (n = 104), adults (n = 112) and elderly subjects (n = 349) with a semi-quantitative questionnaire survey on the pattern of food intake was conducted in the adults and elderly, found that 45.3% of the children, 51.7% of the adults and 55.3% of the elderly had urine iodine concentration below the criteria for iodine sufficiency (< 0.79 mumol/l). Iodine content in the drinking water and salt was low(48).

3. Soy and seaweed
In the study to evaluate the relevant literature and provide the clinician guidance for advising their patients about the effects of soy on thyroid function, showed that soy foods, by inhibiting absorption, may increase the dose of thyroid hormone required by hypothyroid patients. However, hypothyroid adults need not avoid soy foods. In addition, there remains a theoretical concern based on in vitro and animal data that in individuals with compromised thyroid function and/or whose iodine intake is marginal soy foods may increase risk of developing clinical hypothyroidism(49a). Others suggested that Seaweed ingestion increased I/C concentrations (P < .0001) and serum TSH (P < .0001) (1.69 +/- 0.22 vs. 2.19 +/- 0.22 microU/mL, mean +/- SE). Soy supplementation did not affect thyroid end points. Seven weeks of 5 g/day seaweed supplementation was associated with a small but statistically significant increase in TSH. Soy protein isolate supplementation was not associated with changes in serum thyroid hormone concentrations(49). 

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